Class of 2024: Committed to climate solutions
Research and stories

Class of 2024: Committed to climate solutions

In recent years, Washington University has exponentially expanded its climate and sustainability programs. The reason? Demand. The crisis demands immediate action; the rapidly expanding climate sector demands highly educated leaders; and students demand an education that prepares them to tackle what they say is a top priority.

WashU Expert: How does dicamba drift?
Biodiversity

WashU Expert: How does dicamba drift?

Kimberly Parker, an assistant professor of energy, environmental and chemical engineering, studies dicamba in the lab under different variables to determine the mechanisms behind how it turns into vapor, a process called volatilization.

WashU team to study virus transmission, human-wildlife interaction
Biodiversity

WashU team to study virus transmission, human-wildlife interaction

Red colobus monkeys are the most threatened group of African monkeys. A Washington University in St. Louis team will model viral transmission dynamics among red colobus monkeys and their human neighbors near Kibale National Park, Uganda. The collaboration got its start with support from Arts & Sciences under its Incubator for Transdisciplinary Futures research cluster, “The Human-Wildlife Interface.”

For the birds
Biodiversity

For the birds

Nathan Jacobs leads team that developed BirdSAT, a tool for classification and ecological mapping of global bird species.

Viewing 1 - 10 of 13